The man who planted vegetables

Just one year after its creation, the Ferme de rue Montréal has become a veritable urban ecosystem where an impressive variety of vegetables, fruits, herbs and honey flowers grow.

A few years ago, Réal Migneault, the promoter of this magnificent project, made a request that he could use a plot of land in the Saint-Jude sanctuary, located in the heart of the Ahuntsic neighborhood, to grow edible plants there. . Following a positive response in 2019, the Montreal street farm has taken root in an area with an area of ​​approximately 600 m2.


La Ferme de rue is not only productive but also very beautiful.

Photo courtesy, Albert Mondor

La Ferme de rue is not only productive but also very beautiful.

During the summer of 2020, under the supervision of Mr. Migneault, about thirty neighborhood residents mobilized to remove the grass covering the site and prepare the ground. They loosened the soil using a grelinette and incorporated large amounts of compost. Particularly motivated, they also planted several hundred garlic bulbs with the aim of harvesting next year.

Then, last spring, vegetable plants were planted and planted. This first year of cultivation exceeded all Réal Migneault expectations. It was a lesson rich in lessons, during which he was able to get acquainted with the site and determine which edible plants were most suitable and productive. However, like any good farmer, Réal believes there is still a lot to improve on this project and he is fully aware of all the work that needs to be done to achieve this.

A kiosk set up at the Rona Major & Major hardware store, located on rue Sauvé, sells locally produced vegetables to Ferme de rue Montréal. This is the first deal of its kind in Quebec. However, due to lack of staff, Réal had to decide to temporarily close the kiosk and sell the food produced directly to restaurants and neighborhood residents in the evening after field work.


1016 CASA Flowers and vegetable garden

Photo courtesy, Albert Mondor

However, nothing seems to discourage the founder of Ferme de rue as next year, he plans to install a container in which we can plant seeds, wash and cool harvested vegetables and store equipment. He would also like to finally install a second container in which a kiosk for selling vegetables would be set up.

Most of the typical most consumed food plants like tomatoes, carrots and lettuce grow on the Montreal Street Farm. However, there are also some little known plant varieties, which are very popular in the neighborhood restaurants that the farm supplies every week. Thus, very original plants like icy ficoids, watermelon radish, shiso and Malabar spinach are gathered every week for the pleasure of the neighborhood residents who frequent the area restaurants.

back to earth


The harvest is abundant on the Montreal Street Farm.

Photo courtesy, Albert Mondor

The harvest is abundant on the Montreal Street Farm.

It has been more than twenty years since Réal Migneault settled in the Ahuntsic district. He made his first vegetable gardens in community gardens and, in agreement with his owner, then used the land around the place where he lives to grow edible plants. “I quickly became self-sufficient and got a lot of vegetables for my family needs. So I became somewhat of a food provider for my community. »

Before taking this turn towards urban agriculture, Réal Migneault worked for a large architectural firm in Montreal as an international consultant on sustainable development, a highly demanding and stressful job. “When I found myself in my vegetable garden, growing vegetables, I felt good, I was really happy and perfect at the moment. In 2017, Réal decided to live his passion full-time and began studying at the National Institute of Organic Agriculture in Cégep de Victoriaville.

Then, in 2020, he set up the Montreal Street Farm, thus contributing to popular education for urban agriculture as well as food security in his neighborhood. “It is a very rewarding experience to share my passion for urban agriculture with people, especially children. Nothing is more enjoyable than seeing young people picking tomatoes on the farm after their school day is over! “, Explains Réal.

Leave a Comment